Monday, 1 November 2010

Titchwell RSPB, Norfolk

Titchwell RSPB reserve is another 'must see' place to bird when visiting the north Norfolk coast. It has a variety of habitats which is always going to attract a proportionate variety of birds. There's some woodland as well as reedbeds, freshwater marsh, saltwater marsh and also the beach and the sea. For more information on this popular reserve click on the link above. Titchwell reserve is definitely a place that warrants the use of a scope, so maybe you can picture me (5ft 1" )juggling with a scope, bins, and two cameras! (-: In this photo, you can see the legs of my scope getting in the way of my shot (I guess I should've taken the time to put it down, but at the time, I was on a mission to get to the beach)!
The blue sky reflected beautifully onto the freshwater marsh which made the sandy tufty islands and banks really stand out in contrast.
Some, but not enough of the waders were reasonably close. This Redshank was obliging enough.
The calm day made for some nice reflections.
Here it's showing off the reason for its name! A common but very smart looking bird.
I enjoyed this Eurasian Teal with the early morning sun showing up his rich chestnut and teal green face. I also loved the patterns in the water here.
As he swam away from me, he made interesting textures in the water.
Here, showing the sun on that bright emerald green speculum.
One of the great sights and sounds I associate with Norfolk is the geese spectacle. Most of my previous trips here have been in the winter (February) when the geese are at their peak (in their thousands). In October they were just beginning to build up numbers and it was great to see this visible build up as the week went on. Below are a few Brent Geese flying over Titchwell reserve with their abrupt brrrrrup type call.
I finally made it out to the beach ( a good 20 minute brisk walk) and settled down with a few other birders to scan out to sea as well as pick off the names of waders feeding on the tideline. These included Oystercatchers, Dunlin, Turnstones, Sanderling, Bar-tailed Godwits, Curlew and Grey Plover (Black-bellied US)

Only one species of wader ventured further away from the tideline and closer to us. It was great fun to watch these Sanderling 'working' the soft sand here. Running along in their peculiar but endearing clockwork toy style. (One of my friends remarked that when there's a good bird to go for, I resemble a Sanderling somewhat! Hmmmm!) (-:
You can see in both of these photos, adult winter birds (very pale) and beautifully patterned juveniles.
I'll have more from Norfolk in the next post.

13 comments:

eileeninmd said...

Looks like a great place for birding. Love all the birds and your photos.

The Giraffe Head Tree said...

Ah, Jenny, I love your ramblings amid nature and birds. You have some great, colorful reflection photos - that blue sky and its reflections with the ripples, gasp! So run along now in your peculiar but endearing clockwork toy style and find some more treats to show us - LOL! I love that! You have some funny friends! Great pictures of a great outing, Jens. Time to check out that link...

Chris said...

Cool post jenny and I can see you got sanderling... Did you ask if they were coming from the big North ;-) I love your eurasian common teal pictures too. Strangely some have decided to overwinter over here ;-)

Rural Rambler said...

Good Afternoon Wren! I love shore/beach birds. Probably because I love the shore, Ha! But I could sit for hours and watch them do what shore birds do and I love watching them wade in the water. They seem so busy and filled with purpose, I have to laugh at them! Th shots of the Teal and the sky and reflections are wonderful!

Mary said...

Another wonderful place! I would have been worn out from just carrying the equipment you mention. I laughed at the idea of you scurrying along the beach like a sanderling :-) Great flight shot. I love when geese migrate and can't wait until they get here this year. You got some lovely photos....I like that emerald feather on the duck and the Red Shanks and Sanderlings.

Jenny said...

Hi there Eileen, thanks again for coming along on my trip to Norfolk. I think they'll be maybe another three posts....

Howdy Debs, well, I guess I have to admit that when we hear about a good bird, I do tend to hit the 'afterburner' button and zoom off into the distance. I just can't help it! (-:

Bonjour Chris, those Sanderlings did happen to talk about a strange creature up north there. Apparently it was lying flat on the ground with a weird looking contraption up to it's face! (-:

Howdy Pix, it's funny, even though we had more time than usual up there in Norfolk, I still felt that we didn't give enough time to Titchwell reserve. Maybe next time.....

Howdy Mary, actually, all that gear is alot to carry and sometimes I have to make tough decisions as to whether to bother carrying the scope. Enevitably, the time I decide to leave it in the car is the time I could really do with it for IDing something!!! (-:

Eve said...

You've got me in the mood to get out and get to the water with my camera Jenny. The winter birds are starting to show up and hopefully this year I'll get out there and learn more of them. Love the Teal.

Roy said...

Love the Teal's wake Jen.

Quiet Paths said...

Well, I just can't decide whether I'd like to run down that beach or put my kayak in the water right there and follow that pretty Eurasian Teal where ever. Quietly following well behind, mind you. You have to know those water shots make me restless! :)

Jenny said...

Hi Evie, well that's a good thing, must look out for some watery posts from you! (-;

Hi Roy, yes, one of my fav shots from Norfolk.

Hi Christine, sorry for making you restless, specially with winter coming on!!! (-: I think you would've loved doing both of those things if you'd been there! It's a lovely spot.

TonyC said...

Hi Jen, can you chase some of your birds over here please? Migration is off to a very slow start here.... Great shots evoking more memories.

Chris said...

What a strange creature in the big north, with something up to its face.. I've to check this out ;-)

Mary said...

I just realized how much that Eurasian Teal is like the Green-winged Teal I saw! They are shown on the same page of my Sibley book.