Tuesday, 30 June 2009

Arne day out continued...

This heathland habitat is so distinctive with the purple heather, the bright green bracken and dark green Pine trees. Unfortunately the yellow Gorse wasn't in flower which is a shame as I love the coconut scent it produces.The woodland here seems to be made up of mainly Oak and Birch with some Ash thrown in.I seem to be coming across lovely old burry English Oaks at the moment. My husband would LOVE to use the wood from this tree!I spied my namesake chattering away on this old birch log. I wonder if it had a nest nearby as it was certainly scolding us as we walked on by.We were treated to the singing of this lovely male Yellowhammer. They tend to sit on the top of trees or hedgerows to sing, but only let you get so far (with camera) until they drop down out of sight. Here he is cropped heavily so that you can admire that lovely chestnut rump and sunshine yellow plumage!I'll finish of this outing to Arne in my next post.

8 comments:

Rural Rambler said...

I just can't get over how beautiful the purple heather is in both your posts. Fields of heather, I would love to look out and see that in my little bit of country!

Your crop of the Yellowhammer is a wonderful capture and no noise there! :) Very pretty bird. And speaking of your namesake we have 6 baby wrens in a birdhouse right now!

The English Oaks are amazing!

dog trot farm said...

What royal character those oaks have. The fields of heather are just beautiful Jenny.

Mary said...

Always wondered what a field of heather would look like...reminds me of a poem I learned years ago. That Yellowhammer is so pretty! I can see why your husband would want that wood...what a lot of burls! We have a tree with a bunch of burls, but I doubt it is good wood otherwise..Mulberry, I think.

NatureStop said...

The Yellowhammer looks beautiful.The fields of heather are beautiful.

Jenny said...

Hi RR, What is the country round where you live? Farmland? Woodland? Just wondering. How lovely to have nesting birds in the garden, I would love that.

Hi Julie, Oak and Beech are probably my favourite trees, and yes that heather looked amazing that day.

Hi Mary, Chris has actually used Mulberry wood before including burrs. It's quite a rich yellow colour, at least when it is first cut.

Hi A & S, glad you liked the post.

Roy said...

Yes those Yellowhammers are not easy to get close to Jen.

The Oak. Ahm! well didn't you have a chainsaw in the boot.

Rural Rambler said...

Jenny in answer to your question the predominant land around us are pastures full of beef cattle and horses and a donkey and llama thrown in here and there. Very wide ribbons of wooded areas separate the pasture fields. If we drive easterly just a bit lots of corn, soybeans and winter wheat. :)

Eve said...

I am so far behind Jenny! These photos are beautiful! I love that Yellowhammer!